Paint!

(Year Three, summer)

My work area, a.k.a. The Beer Bench. I happened to have the largest cooler, so one of us boatyard DIYers would buy the ice and the others the beer, and the other guys would stop by throughout the day to take a break from the sun.
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Captain Bob, all “smurfed up”, a widely-known boatyard affliction commonly appearing after sanding bottom paint (a cause–and–effect relationship is strongly suspected.) Yes, he was wearing paper overalls and using a vacuum; this is still what happens.
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My crew. The couple a few boats over signed her off their boat and on to mine. Her name is Wilsona; her brother was in that Tom Hanks movie Castaway. She’s good company, but she doesn’t do a damn bit of work!
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One of the two half-sheet of plywood “SLOW – PAINT” signs that many yard visitors just ignored. The second time I painted, I pulled an empty trailer half-way into the driveway between the rows of boats and placed several 55–gallon garbage drums and cement blocks to force cars to go through a slow serpentine on the dusty gravel. They got the message.
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Starboard side, the hull sanded smooth and ready for paint.
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Starboard side forward
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What a difference a coat of primer makes on the deck!
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The non–skid areas taped off for painting the deck.
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Look at the shine on that hull! That’s just the first coat of Interlux Toplac, rolled and tipped! Woo-hoo! (The deck is still just unsanded primer.)
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New paint job, new boot stripe and cove stripe, and new Lexan portlights installed! Woo-hoo!
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She passes the 10-foot test well; any closer and yes, you may notice imperfections. Well, I guess that’s just like me, so maybe we’re a team. I’ll tell you, if you do this much work on a hull, you will bond with her!
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